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Constable's blog

Policing throughout the western world is changing from the heavy punitive action of "Fire Brigade" policing (i.e. responding to crime after it has been committed), to the more preventative approach, where we use historically gathered intelligence to identify social and community issues which may be contributing to the problem. Then, using the assistance of partner organisations such as Safer CHB, Ministry of Social Development, Housing NZ, endeavour to put programs in place to assist these communities to rise above the issues which are dogging them.

Don't get me wrong, we still have zero tolerance toward anti-social behavior, and our courts are still busy every day, but we envisage that, over time, we can get these numbers down thereby making our communities safer places to live.

Merry Christmas

It is what most of us look forward to all year, the festive season and our annual holidays. It's up to each and every one of us to keep the memories of this time of year happy ones.

So if you are going away for the holidays, start by making sure you have done everything possible to protect your home and contents. Make sure all your doors and windows are secure and your neighbours know that you will be away and how long for. Make sure you have not left garden tools lying about for opportunist burglars to use to gain entry to your home. Ask your neighbours to park a car in your driveway, and even hang some of their washing on your line. Invest in a timer which switches a light on for a few hours each night.

If you are driving anywhere,  avoid any alcohol what so ever before driving, make sure you are well rested, take regular breaks, and don't be tempted to use your cell phone while driving. Remember the 4km/h tolerance level and wear your seatbelt.

Wishing you all a memorable festive season.

From Constable Glynn Sharp

During September and into October, rural Buglaries have been on the rise. Our biggest concern is the number of fire arms being stolen. While all property can be replaced either by insurance or at personal cost, stolen fire arms are most often distributed amongst the criminal fraternity. A single burglary of this type often yields 5-6 firearms. This is the ideal reward for the offenders as there is always ready cash available from the likes of criminal gangs.

I appeal to all gun owners to take extra  care securing your fire arms. It may be inconvenient but but the consequences of not doing so could prove dire. 

Over the past month or two, dishonesty offening has been on the increase, in particular, burglary. Offenders have struck in both urban and rural areas, with farmers losing some high value equipment and livestock. Some incidents have been more niusance value that anything else, but that does not alter the fact that some low life has invaded the sanctity of your home or private property. 

The community as a whole needs to become more pro-active in protecting their property. CCTV camera systems have become very affordable, and the technology has improved in leaps and bounds. The system can be accessed via a Smart Phone giving you access to your camera system where ever you may be.

Sensor lights and gate alarms have all become very affordable, and while not fool proof, all serve as a deterrant.

The Central Rural area is once again becomming the target for thieves and burglars. Over the past 2 weeks three farms have been "hit" by burglars. A farmer in Linsay Rd lost 2 late model Honda ATV's along with three smaller 2 wheel motor cycles, a chain saw  , leaf blower and an edge trimmer. These were taken from a shed situated right beside the main house. The burglars took advantage of a stormy windy night which would have masked any noise they made.

One of the exciting aspects of being a police officer is the fact that we never know what we are going to be faced with before we start work each day.

We may arrive at work for the start of the shift having made plans to deal with some mundane enquiry which has been  sitting in your in-tray for some time only find that we have been roped in to an investigation into a serious incident which may have occurred over night. That mundane enquiry goes back to the bottom of the list.